Tag Archives: Award Winning VidLink 1.5G Wireless RF Uncompressed HD and 3D Video Transport

60GHz Unlicensed Wireless Video

60GHz Wireless HD SDI GoalCam Receiver

The Globally Unlicensed 60 GHz Frequency Band for Uncompressed HD SDI Video Transmission 

Transmitting video wirelessly over the 60 GHz spectrum can be an ideal solution for line of sight applications. Clearly, by definition, a wireless solution eliminates the need for cabling such as fiber or coax, which can be difficult or impossible to use in many instances. Additionally, other wireless frequencies come up short for two major reasons. First, lower frequency solutions like Wi-Fi do not have the bandwidth to transport uncompressed HD video, and would therefore need to compress the video at its source, transmit it across wirelessly, and then uncompressed the video at the receive end. This would both add latency and, much more importantly, reduce video quality, which is critical. Second, these lower frequency solutions in unlicensed bands are subject to a great deal of interference, which can adversely affect, and even shut down, a wireless video stream. This would clearly be unacceptable in many situations, and because of its unlicensed status, anyone with a Wi-Fi transmitter could, accidentally or maliciously, interfere with these transmissions.    Continue reading

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Uncompressed Wireless HD

Wes Simpson / 05.02.2012 12:35PM

Moving 1.5 Gbps HD signals from one place to another has long been the exclusive domain of wired systems. These could be baseband wired systems (coax, anyone?), fiber-optic systems, or high-speed (10 Gig) Ethernet systems. But until recently, it hasn’t been feasible to transmit these high-speed signals over wireless connections. Now, some new technologies are emerging that have the bandwidth capacity to handle these jumbo-size bit streams.

COFDM

Broadcasters have long used private microwave systems for transporting video signals at sports and other events where camera mobility is valuable. These systems, which often employ COFDM (Coded Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing), typically use licensed frequencies that are coordinated at each venue to avoid interference between different users. Even though these systems have direct HD video inputs and outputs, the radio channel bit rates are not large enough to support uncompressed HD. So, these systems resort to using MPEG-2 and H.264 compression to get the signal to fit within the bit rate of the wireless stream.

60 GHZ

One way to get enough RF bandwidth for an uncompressed HD signal is to use a frequency band where there are fewer limitations and no license required, such as in the 60 GHz band. At least one company, VidOvation, has produced a 60GHz wireless link that is used for transmitting 1.5 Gbps video from an in-goal camera for ice hockey. In this application, the signal transport is one-way, and the receiver can be mounted in the ceiling rafters above the rink. Antennas with narrow beam widths (less than 5 degrees) are used for two reasons: to get higher gain in the direction that the antenna is pointing and to reduce the probability that a source of interference will be within the beam pattern of the receiver.

In-net GoalCam

VidOvation Goalcam, deployed in the most recent NHL season, uses a 60 GHz wireless link to transmit 1.5 Gbps video from an in-goal camera.

MIMO

Multiple Input, Multiple Output radio technology has been a big step forward for high-data rate applications. MIMO systems use multiple inputs to the radio channel (i.e. multiple RF transmitters each feeding a transmit antenna), and multiple outputs (i.e. multiple receive antennas each feeding an RF receiver). Advanced digital signal processing technology in the receiver section allows the different radio signals (which all share the same RF channel frequency) to be separated so that each of the incoming streams can be decoded using the principle of “spatial diversity.” When MIMO systems are deployed, notations such as “2×2” or “4×4” are used to indicate the number of RF transmitters and RF receivers used in the system, with each TX or RX connected to a separate antenna.

Some current digital transmission systems use MIMO technology quite effectively. LTE (Long Term Evolution, often called 4G) mobile phone systems can use MIMO arrangements; in fact, many LTE base stations use MIMO technology to increase throughput and reduce gaps in coverage. The popular WiFi standard 802.11n (which operates in the 2.4 GHz frequency band) supports up to 4×4 MIMO, which gives a theoretical channel bit rate of 600 Mbps. Actual data throughput over such a link would be much lower, due to packet overhead, inter-frame gaps, the need to allow for half-duplex operation, imperfections in the RF channel environment (caused by all those laptops and microwave ovens).

802.11AC

Fig. 1: Comparative speeds for IEEE ’s 802.11 wireless protocol

Fig. 1: Comparative speeds for IEEE ’s 802.11 wireless protocol

The IEEE is finishing up work on a new standard in the very popular 802.11 series, which already includes WiFi and the 802.11n protocols (see Fig. 1). This new standard, 802.11ac, uses signals in the 5–5.8 GHz range, where 802.11a and other systems currently operate on unlicensed frequencies. This is both good and bad; good, because no license is required from the FCC, but also bad, because the number of devices using this frequency will likely increase exponentially as soon as products using the new standard come to market, which is forecast to occur in late 2012 or in 2013.

The biggest benefit of 802.11ac is a substantial increase in the bit rates that can be sent over a wireless channel—up to a theoretical channel bit rate of 6.93 Gbps. This speed would require the use of eight (spatially diverse) transmit antennas, eight (diverse) receive antennas, 256QAM modulation and a 160 MHz radio channel, of which there are only two in the 5 GHz band. In a real application, actual throughput will be much lower, but this technology should still be able to deliver uncompressed HD transmission in some applications some of the time, particularly if the transmitter and receiver are close to each other and other RF interference is minimal.

LOOKING FORWARD

Uncompressed HD video can be transmitted wirelessly at 1.5 Gbps today using 60 GHz technology for some specialized applications. When products that support new standards, such as 802.11ac, come to market, it will be at least theoretically possible to use 5 GHz wireless transmission for uncompressed HD. Once chipsets become available, look for manufacturers to introduce equipment for both general purpose (i.e laptop and tablet) and video-specific applications.

Click for full article from TV Technology

Thanks to Jim Jachetta from VidOvation for supplying some of the data used in this article.  Please follow Jim Jachetta on Twitter @JimJachetta.

Posted in 802.11x - 802.11b - 802.11g - 802.11n, Applications - Industries, Broadcast, Editorial Coverage, Haute Spot, NHL - National Hockey League, Sports, TV Technology, Wireless Video | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NAB Perspectives: VidOvation’s Jachetta Talks Disputed Goals, Accelerated File Transfer

By: Karen Hogan, Assistant Editor
Tuesday, April 24, 2012 – 11:53 am
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The NHL Stanley Cup playoffs are well under way, and VidOvation’s In-Net GoalCam has the best seat in all 16 first-round houses. The company’s In-Net GoalCam 60 GHz wireless technology is mounted in each goal, delivering fully uncompressed video with no bit or resolution manipulation.

In-net Wireless GoalCam for Goal VerificationPresident/CEO Jim Jachetta shows off In-Net GoalCam.

“The video goes from the goal, up to the NHL rack in the replay room, [and] then gets transported to Toronto, where Head Official Mike Murphy looks at all the instant replays,” says VidOvation President/CEO Jim Jachetta. “If there’s a disputed call, they rewind the recorders and look to see if the puck is in or out.”

The In-Net GoalCam, which feeds HD, 720p video via RF transmitter, can be adjusted, panned, tilted, focused, and zoomed remotely via PC. The system includes a receiver that can be mounted in the ceiling up to 150 ft. high.

Also on display at last week’s NAB Show, the SSFC100 Storage Protocol and File Accelerator was developed through VidOvation’s partnership with UK-based ARG Digital. Specifically designed for linking storage area networks without the performance penalties normally associated with long-distance connections, the File Accelerator lends itself particularly well to sports. Using the example of an NBA Playoff game, Jachetta describes a scenario in which the game video has to be sent to the NBA’s archiving facilities for metadata tagging and highlight creation.

“You run into problems moving these large files across networks, whether public networks or private networks,” he says, “It’s difficult for the Internet to handle these very large files. A device like the File Accelerator will reduce the time eightfold or more to move these large files. Say, a file took eight hours to get through the network using traditional protocols; the device will cut that down to 45 minutes.

“In our fast paced world,” he continues, “the quicker the video files can get through the network, the better.”

See the story at http://sportsvideo.org/main/blog/2012/04/24/vidovations-jachetta-talks-disputed-goals-accelerated-file-transfer/

By: Karen Hogan, Assistant Editor
Tuesday, April 24, 2012 – 11:53 am

The NHL Stanley Cup playoffs are well under way, and VidOvation’s In-Net GoalCam has the best seat in all 16 first-round houses. The company’s In-Net GoalCam 60 GHz wireless technology is mounted in each goal, delivering fully uncompressed video with no bit or resolution manipulation.

President/CEO Jim Jachetta shows off In-Net GoalCam.

“The video goes from the goal, up to the NHL rack in the replay room, [and] then gets transported to Toronto, where Head Official Mike Murphy looks at all the instant replays,” says VidOvation President/CEO Jim Jachetta. “If there’s a disputed call, they rewind the recorders and look to see if the puck is in or out.”

The In-Net GoalCam, which feeds HD, 720p video via RF transmitter, can be adjusted, panned, tilted, focused, and zoomed remotely. The system includes a receiver that can be mounted in the ceiling up to 150 ft. high.

Also on display at last week’s NAB Show, the SSFC100 Storage Protocol and File Accelerator was developed through VidOvation’s partnership with UK-based ARG Digital. Specifically designed for linking storage area networks without the performance penalties normally associated with long-distance connections, the File Accelerator lends itself particularly well to sports. Using the example of an NBA Playoff game, Jachetta describes a scenario in which the game video has to be sent to the NBA’s archiving facilities for metadata tagging and highlight creation.

“You run into problems moving these large files across networks, whether public networks or private networks,” he says, “It’s difficult for the Internet to handle these very large files. A device like the File Accelerator will reduce the time eightfold or more to move these large files. Say, a file took eight hours to get through the network using traditional protocols; the device will cut that down to 45 minutes.

“In our fast paced world,” he continues, “the quicker the video files can get through the network, the better.”

Posted in Applications - Industries, Broadcast, NAB Show, NHL - National Hockey League, Sports, Storage - Archive, Trade Shows, Wireless Video | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NY Islanders first for VidOvation NHL In-net GoalCam Cameras for Goal Verification

VidOvation and the NHL integration team have successful installed the first set of In-net HD Goal Cameras for Goal Verification for the NY Islanders.

Please click to see video highlights with VidOvation GoalCam camouflaged on the back upper crossbar.

The In-net GoalCam 60GHz wireless technology is a customizable solution that fits the most demanding sports needs.  This one-of-a-kind wireless technology delivers fully uncompressed video with no bit or resolution manipulation.  Utilizing a 60 GHz wireless platform, the GoalCam offers uncompressed and un-coded broadcast quality video at a competitive price.  While the RF transmitter and camera is integrated in a custom ruggedized housing with an extruded aluminum tube with polycarbonate shock resistant domes on each end.  Not to mention an integrated safety and quick release positive registration bracket that adjusts to all mounting application.

Posted in Applications - Industries, News, NHL - National Hockey League, Sports, Wireless Video | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Maple Leafs Player Destroyed A Pricey Goal Camera – Our GoalCam can take a bullet

Our goal cam can take a bullet – can’t wait to challenge the NHL players when we integrate our systems. VidOvation will start delivering in-net wireless goal cameras for each of the NHL’s 30 venues. The goal cameras use 60-GHz wireless HD-SDI RF technology to aid and support officiating and instant replay to ensure accurate calls.

Toronto Maple Leafs player Joffrey Lupul cost someone a pretty penny when he broke an in-goal camera with a sizzling shot last night.

The goal tied the game at one, and the Leafs went on to win it in OT.

Here’s the video, the carnage comes at the 22 second mark (via Puck Daddy):

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/toronto-lupul-shot-camera-2011-10#ixzz1bYcVcDFg

Posted in Editorial Coverage, News, NHL - National Hockey League, Sports, Wireless Video | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment